Maxioms Pet

X
  •   12  /  16  

    The Ass and His Purchaser
    A MAN wished to purchase an Ass, and agreed with its owner that
    he should try out the animal before he bought him. He took the
    Ass home and put him in the straw-yard with his other Asses, upon
    which the new animal left all the others and at once joined the
    one that was most idle and the greatest eater of them all.
    Seeing this, the man put a halter on him and led him back to his
    owner. On being asked how, in so short a time, he could have
    made a trial of him, he answered, I do not need a trial; I know
    that he will be just the same as the one he chose for his
    companion.
    A man is known by the company he keeps.

Share to:

You May Also Like   /   View all maxioms

  ( comments )
  18  /  32  

The Traveler and His Dog
A Traveler about to set out on a journey saw his Dog stand at the read more

The Traveler and His Dog
A Traveler about to set out on a journey saw his Dog stand at the door stretching himself. He asked him sharply: Why do you stand there gaping? Everything is ready but you, so come with me instantly. The Dog, wagging his tail, replied: O, master! I am quite ready; it is you for whom I am waiting.
The loiterer often blames delay on his more active friend.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  11  /  17  

The Astronomer
An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through read more

The Astronomer
An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through the suburbs with his whole attention fixed on the sky, he fell accidentally into a deep well. While he lamented and bewailed his sores and bruises, and cried loudly for help, a neighbor ran to the well, and learning what had happened said: Hark ye, old fellow, why, in striving to pry into what is in heaven, do you not manage to see what is on earth?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  18  /  16  

The Charger and the Miller
A charger, feeling the infirmities of age, was sent to work in a mill instead read more

The Charger and the Miller
A charger, feeling the infirmities of age, was sent to work in a mill instead of going out to battle. But when he was compelled to grind instead of serving in the wars, he bewailed his change of fortune and called to mind his former state, saying, Ah! Miller, I had indeed to go campaigning before, but I was barbed from counter to tail, and a man went along to groom me; and now I cannot understand what ailed me to prefer the mill before the battle. Forbear, said the Miller to him, harping on what was of yore, for it is the common lot of mortals to sustain the ups and downs of fortune.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  22  /  19  

The Ants and the Grasshopper
THE ANTS were spending a fine winter's day drying grain collected
in the summertime. read more

The Ants and the Grasshopper
THE ANTS were spending a fine winter's day drying grain collected
in the summertime. A Grasshopper, perishing with famine, passed
by and earnestly begged for a little food. The Ants inquired of
him, Why did you not treasure up food during the summer?' He
replied, I had not leisure enough. I passed the days in
singing. They then said in derision: If you were foolish enough
to sing all the summer, you must dance supperless to bed in the
winter.
It is thrifty to prepare today for the wants of tomorrow.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  12  /  21  

The Ass and the Mule
A muleteer set forth on a journey, driving before him an Ass and a Mule, read more

The Ass and the Mule
A muleteer set forth on a journey, driving before him an Ass and a Mule, both well laden. The Ass, as long as he traveled along the plain, carried his load with ease, but when he began to ascend the steep path of the mountain, felt his load to be more than he could bear. He entreated his companion to relieve him of a small portion, that he might carry home the rest; but the Mule paid no attention to the request. The Ass shortly afterwards fell down dead under his burden. Not knowing what else to do in so wild a region, the Muleteer placed upon the Mule the load carried by the Ass in addition to his own, and at the top of all placed the hide of the Ass, after he had skinned him. The Mule, groaning beneath his heavy burden, said to himself: I am treated according to my deserts. If I had only been willing to assist the Ass a little in his need, I should not now be bearing, together with his burden, himself as well.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  12  /  26  

Androcles
A slave named Androcles once escaped from his master and fled
to the forest. As he was wandering about read more

Androcles
A slave named Androcles once escaped from his master and fled
to the forest. As he was wandering about there he came upon a
Lion lying down moaning and groaning. At first he turned to flee,
but finding that the Lion did not pursue him, he turned back and
went up to him. As he came near, the Lion put out his paw, which
was all swollen and bleeding, and Androcles found that a huge
thorn had got into it, and was causing all the pain. He pulled
out the thorn and bound up the paw of the Lion, who was soon able
to rise and lick the hand of Androcles like a dog. Then the Lion
took Androcles to his cave, and every day used to bring him meat
from which to live. But shortly afterwards both Androcles and the
Lion were captured, and the slave was sentenced to be thrown to
the Lion, after the latter had been kept without food for several
days. The Emperor and all his Court came to see the spectacle,
and Androcles was led out into the middle of the arena. Soon the
Lion was let loose from his den, and rushed bounding and roaring
towards his victim. But as soon as he came near to Androcles he
recognised his friend, and fawned upon him, and licked his hands
like a friendly dog. The Emperor, surprised at this, summoned
Androcles to him, who told him the whole story. Whereupon the
slave was pardoned and freed, and the Lion let loose to his native
forest.
Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  14  /  21  

The Boys and the Frogs
Some boys, playing near a pond, saw a number of Frogs in the water and read more

The Boys and the Frogs
Some boys, playing near a pond, saw a number of Frogs in the water and began to pelt them with stones. They killed several of them, when one of the Frogs, lifting his head out of the water, cried out: Pray stop, my boys: what is sport to you, is death to us.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  16  /  27  

The Hare and the Tortoise
A hare one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who read more

The Hare and the Tortoise
A hare one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who replied, laughing: Though you be swift as the wind, I will beat you in a race. The Hare, believing her assertion to be simply impossible, assented to the proposal; and they agreed that the Fox should choose the course and fix the goal. On the day appointed for the race the two started together. The Tortoise never for a moment stopped, but went on with a slow but steady pace straight to the end of the course. The Hare, lying down by the wayside, fell fast asleep. At last waking up, and moving as fast as he could, he saw the Tortoise had reached the goal, and was comfortably dozing after her fatigue.
Slow but steady wins the race.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
  ( comments )
  33  /  59  

The Father and His Sons
A father had a family of sons who were perpetually quarreling among themselves. When he read more

The Father and His Sons
A father had a family of sons who were perpetually quarreling among themselves. When he failed to heal their disputes by his exhortations, he determined to give them a practical illustration of the evils of disunion; and for this purpose he one day told them to bring him a bundle of sticks. When they had done so, he placed the faggot into the hands of each of them in succession, and ordered them to break it in pieces. They tried with all their strength, and were not able to do it. He next opened the faggot, took the sticks separately, one by one, and again put them into his sons' hands, upon which they broke them easily. He then addressed them in these words: My sons, if you are of one mind, and unite to assist each other, you will be as this faggot, uninjured by all the attempts of your enemies; but if you are divided among yourselves, you will be broken as easily as these sticks.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
Share to:
Maxioms Web Pet