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    The Ass and the Frogs
    AN ASS, carrying a load of wood, passed through a pond. As he
    was crossing through the water he lost his footing, stumbled and
    fell, and not being able to rise on account of his load, groaned
    heavily. Some Frogs frequenting the pool heard his lamentation,
    and said, What would you do if you had to live here always as we
    do, when you make such a fuss about a mere fall into the water?
    Men often bear little grievances with less courage thanthey do large misfortunes.

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Hercules and the Wagoner
A CARTER was driving a wagon along a country lane, when the wheels sank down deep read more

Hercules and the Wagoner
A CARTER was driving a wagon along a country lane, when the wheels sank down deep into a rut. The rustic driver, stupefied and aghast, stood looking at the wagon, and did nothing but utter loud cries to Hercules to come and help him. Hercules, it is said, appeared and thus addressed him: Put your shoulders to the wheels, my man. Goad on your bullocks, and never more pray to me for help, until you have done your best to help yourself, or depend upon it you will henceforth pray in vain.
Self-help is the best help.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Pomegranat, Apple-Tree and Bramble
The pomegranate and Apple-Tree disputed as to which was the most beautiful. When their strife read more

The Pomegranat, Apple-Tree and Bramble
The pomegranate and Apple-Tree disputed as to which was the most beautiful. When their strife was at its height, a Bramble from the neighboring hedge lifted up its voice, and said in a boastful tone: Pray, my dear friends, in my presence at least cease from such vain disputings.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Apes and the Two Travelers
TWO MEN, one who always spoke the truth and the other who told
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The Apes and the Two Travelers
TWO MEN, one who always spoke the truth and the other who told
nothing but lies, were traveling together and by chance came to
the land of Apes. One of the Apes, who had raised himself to be
king, commanded them to be seized and brought before him, that he
might know what was said of him among men. He ordered at the
same time that all the Apes be arranged in a long row on his
right hand and on his left, and that a throne be placed for him,
as was the custom among men. After these preparations he
signified that the two men should be brought before him, and
greeted them with this salutation: What sort of a king do I seem
to you to be, O strangers?' The Lying Traveler replied, You seem
to me a most mighty king. And what is your estimate of those
you see around me?' These, he made answer, are worthy
companions of yourself, fit at least to be ambassadors and
leaders of armies. The Ape and all his court, gratified with the
lie, commanded that a handsome present be given to the flatterer.
On this the truthful Traveler thought to himself, If so great a
reward be given for a lie, with what gift may not I be rewarded,
if, according to my custom, I tell the truth?' The Ape quickly
turned to him. And pray how do I and these my friends around me
seem to you?' Thou art, he said, a most excellent Ape, and all
these thy companions after thy example are excellent Apes too.
The King of the Apes, enraged at hearing these truths, gave him
over to the teeth and claws of his companions.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Father and His Two Daughters
A man had two daughters, the one married to a gardener, and the other read more

The Father and His Two Daughters
A man had two daughters, the one married to a gardener, and the other to a tile-maker. After a time he went to the daughter who had married the gardener, and inquired how she was and how all things went with her. She said, All things are prospering with me, and I have only one wish, that there may be a heavy fall of rain, in order that the plants may be well watered. Not long after, he went to the daughter who had married the tilemaker, and likewise inquired of her how she fared; she replied, I want for nothing, and have only one wish, that the dry weather may continue, and the sun shine hot and bright, so that the bricks might be dried. He said to her, If your sister wishes for rain, and you for dry weather, with which of the two am I to join my wishes?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a read more

The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a mortal bite on the Cottager's infant son. Grieving over his loss, the Father resolved to kill the Snake. The next day, when it came out of its hole for food, he took up his axe, but by swinging too hastily, missed its head and cut off only the end of its tail. After some time the Cottager, afraid that the Snake would bite him also, endeavored to make peace, and placed some bread and salt in the hole. The Snake, slightly hissing, said: There can henceforth be no peace between us; for whenever I see you I shall remember the loss of my tail, and whenever you see me you will be thinking of the death of your son.
No one truly forgets injuries in the presence of him who caused the injury.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Vine and the Goat
A vine was luxuriant in the time of vintage with leaves and grapes. A Goat, read more

The Vine and the Goat
A vine was luxuriant in the time of vintage with leaves and grapes. A Goat, passing by, nibbled its young tendrils and its leaves. The Vine addressed him and said: Why do you thus injure me without a cause, and crop my leaves? Is there no young grass left? But I shall not have to wait long for my just revenge; for if you now should crop my leaves, and cut me down to my root, I shall provide the wine to pour over you when you are led as a victim to the sacrifice.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Fisherman Piping
A fisherman skilled in music took his flute and his nets to the seashore. Standing on a read more

The Fisherman Piping
A fisherman skilled in music took his flute and his nets to the seashore. Standing on a projecting rock, he played several tunes in the hope that the fish, attracted by his melody, would of their own accord dance into his net, which he had placed below. At last, having long waited in vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting his net into the sea, made an excellent haul of fish. When he saw them leaping about in the net upon the rock he said: O you most perverse creatures, when I piped you would not dance, but now that I have ceased you do so merrily.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Cock and the Jewel
A COCK, scratching for food for himself and his hens, found a precious stone read more

The Cock and the Jewel
A COCK, scratching for food for himself and his hens, found a precious stone and exclaimed: If your owner had found thee, and not I, he would have taken thee up, and have set thee in thy first estate; but I have found thee for no purpose. I would rather have one barleycorn than all the jewels in the world.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Farmer and the Stork
A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which read more

The Farmer and the Stork
A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. Pray save me, Master, he said, and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane. The Farmer laughed aloud and said, It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company.
Birds of a feather flock together.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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