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    The Farmer and the Stork
    A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. Pray save me, Master, he said, and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane. The Farmer laughed aloud and said, It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company.
    Birds of a feather flock together.

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The Wolf and the Lamb
WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands read more

The Wolf and the Lamb
WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands on him, but to find some plea to justify to the Lamb the Wolf's right to eat him. He thus addressed him: "Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted me." "Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a mournful tone of voice, "I was not then born." Then said the Wolf, "You feed in my pasture." "No, good sir," replied the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass." Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my well." "No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I never yet drank water, for as yet my mother's milk is both food and drink to me." Upon which the Wolf seized him and ate him up, saying, "Well! I won't remain supperless, even though you refute every one of my imputations." The tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Tortoise and the Eagle
A tortoise, lazily basking in the sun, complained to the sea-birds of her hard fate, read more

The Tortoise and the Eagle
A tortoise, lazily basking in the sun, complained to the sea-birds of her hard fate, that no one would teach her to fly. An Eagle, hovering near, heard her lamentation and demanded what reward she would give him if he would take her aloft and float her in the air. I will give you, she said, all the riches of the Red Sea. I will teach you to fly then, said the Eagle; and taking her up in his talons he carried her almost to the clouds suddenly he let her go, and she fell on a lofty mountain, dashing her shell to pieces. The Tortoise exclaimed in the moment of death: I have deserved my present fate; for what had I to do with wings and clouds, who can with difficulty move about on the earth?'
If men had all they wished, they would be often ruined.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ass, the Fox, and the Lion
The ass and the fox, having entered into partnership together for
their mutual read more

The Ass, the Fox, and the Lion
The ass and the fox, having entered into partnership together for
their mutual protection, went out into the forest to hunt. Theyhad
not proceeded far when they met a Lion. The Fox, seeing imminent
danger, approached the Lion and promised to contrive for him the
capture of the Ass if the Lion would pledge his word not to harmthe
Fox. Then, upon assuring the Ass that he would not be injured,the
Fox led him to a deep pit and arranged that he should fall into it.
The Lion, seeing that the Ass was secured, immediately clutchedthe
Fox, and attacked the Ass at his leisure.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Wolves and the Sheep
Why should there always be this fear and slaughter between us? said the Wolves to read more

The Wolves and the Sheep
Why should there always be this fear and slaughter between us? said the Wolves to the Sheep. Those evil-disposed Dogs have much to answer for. They always bark whenever we approach you and attack us before we have done any harm. If you would only dismiss them from your heels, there might soon be treaties of peace and reconciliation between us. The Sheep, poor silly creatures, were easily beguiled and dismissed the Dogs, whereupon the Wolves destroyed the unguarded flock at their own pleasure.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Lion and the Mouse
A LION was awakened from sleep by a Mouse running over his face. Rising up read more

The Lion and the Mouse
A LION was awakened from sleep by a Mouse running over his face. Rising up angrily, he caught him and was about to kill him, when the Mouse piteously entreated, saying: If you would only spare my life, I would be sure to repay your kindness. The Lion laughed and let him go. It happened shortly after this that the Lion was caught by some hunters, who bound him by st ropes to the ground. The Mouse, recognizing his roar, came gnawed the rope with his teeth, and set him free, exclaim
You ridiculed the idea of my ever being able to help you, expecting to receive from me any repayment of your favor; I now you know that it is possible for even a Mouse to con benefits on a Lion.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ant and the Dove
AN ANT went to the bank of a river to quench its thirst, and
read more

The Ant and the Dove
AN ANT went to the bank of a river to quench its thirst, and
being carried away by the rush of the stream, was on the point of
drowning. A Dove sitting on a tree overhanging the water plucked
a leaf and let it fall into the stream close to her. The Ant
climbed onto it and floated in safety to the bank. Shortly
afterwards a birdcatcher came and stood under the tree, and laid
his lime-twigs for the Dove, which sat in the branches. The Ant,
perceiving his design, stung him in the foot. In pain the
birdcatcher threw down the twigs, and the noise made the Dove
take wing.
One good turn deserves another.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Boys and the Frogs
Some boys, playing near a pond, saw a number of Frogs in the water and read more

The Boys and the Frogs
Some boys, playing near a pond, saw a number of Frogs in the water and began to pelt them with stones. They killed several of them, when one of the Frogs, lifting his head out of the water, cried out: Pray stop, my boys: what is sport to you, is death to us.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Astronomer
An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through read more

The Astronomer
An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through the suburbs with his whole attention fixed on the sky, he fell accidentally into a deep well. While he lamented and bewailed his sores and bruises, and cried loudly for help, a neighbor ran to the well, and learning what had happened said: Hark ye, old fellow, why, in striving to pry into what is in heaven, do you not manage to see what is on earth?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Salt Merchant and His Ass
A peddler drove his Ass to the seashore to buy salt. His road home read more

The Salt Merchant and His Ass
A peddler drove his Ass to the seashore to buy salt. His road home lay across a stream into which his Ass, making a false step, fell by accident and rose up again with his load considerably lighter, as the water melted the sack. The Peddler retraced his steps and refilled his panniers with a larger quantity of salt than before. When he came again to the stream, the Ass fell down on purpose in the same spot, and, regaining his feet with the weight of his load much diminished, brayed triumphantly as if he had obtained what he desired. The Peddler saw through his trick and drove him for the third time to the coast, where he bought a cargo of sponges instead of salt. The Ass, again playing the fool, fell down on purpose when he reached the stream, but the sponges became swollen with water, greatly increasing his load. And thus his trick recoiled on him, for he now carried on his back a double burden.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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