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    The Lion in Love
    A lion demanded the daughter of a woodcutter in marriage. The Father, unwilling to grant, and yet afraid to refuse his request, hit upon this expedient to rid himself of his importunities. He expressed his willingness to accept the Lion as the suitor of his daughter on one condition: that he should allow him to extract his teeth, and cut off his claws, as his daughter was fearfully afraid of both. The Lion cheerfully assented to the proposal. But when the toothless, clawless Lion returned to repeat his request, the Woodman, no longer afraid, set upon him with his club, and drove him away into the forest.

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  17  /  16  

The Piglet, the Sheep, and the Goat
A young pig was shut up in a fold-yard with a Goat and read more

The Piglet, the Sheep, and the Goat
A young pig was shut up in a fold-yard with a Goat and a Sheep. On one occasion when the shepherd laid hold of him, he grunted and squeaked and resisted violently. The Sheep and the Goat complained of his distressing cries, saying, He often handles us, and we do not cry out. To this the Pig replied, Your handling and mine are very different things. He catches you only for your wool, or your milk, but he lays hold on me for my very life.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  26  /  27  

The Wolves and the Sheep
Why should there always be this fear and slaughter between us? said the Wolves to read more

The Wolves and the Sheep
Why should there always be this fear and slaughter between us? said the Wolves to the Sheep. Those evil-disposed Dogs have much to answer for. They always bark whenever we approach you and attack us before we have done any harm. If you would only dismiss them from your heels, there might soon be treaties of peace and reconciliation between us. The Sheep, poor silly creatures, were easily beguiled and dismissed the Dogs, whereupon the Wolves destroyed the unguarded flock at their own pleasure.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  11  /  19  

The Two Pots
A river carried down in its stream two Pots, one made of earthenware and the other of read more

The Two Pots
A river carried down in its stream two Pots, one made of earthenware and the other of brass. The Earthen Pot said to the Brass Pot, Pray keep at a distance and do not come near me, for if you touch me ever so slightly, I shall be broken in pieces, and besides, I by no means wish to come near you.
Equals make the best friends.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  12  /  16  

The Ass and His Purchaser
A MAN wished to purchase an Ass, and agreed with its owner that
he read more

The Ass and His Purchaser
A MAN wished to purchase an Ass, and agreed with its owner that
he should try out the animal before he bought him. He took the
Ass home and put him in the straw-yard with his other Asses, upon
which the new animal left all the others and at once joined the
one that was most idle and the greatest eater of them all.
Seeing this, the man put a halter on him and led him back to his
owner. On being asked how, in so short a time, he could have
made a trial of him, he answered, I do not need a trial; I know
that he will be just the same as the one he chose for his
companion.
A man is known by the company he keeps.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  21  /  32  

The Crab and Its Mother
A crab said to her son, Why do you walk so one-sided, my child? It read more

The Crab and Its Mother
A crab said to her son, Why do you walk so one-sided, my child? It is far more becoming to go straight forward. The young Crab replied: Quite true, dear Mother; and if you will show me the straight way, I will promise to walk in it. The Mother tried in vain, and submitted without remonstrance to the reproof of her child.
Example is more powerful than precept.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Flies and the Honey-Pot
A number of Flies were attracted to a jar of honey which had been overturned read more

The Flies and the Honey-Pot
A number of Flies were attracted to a jar of honey which had been overturned in a housekeeper's room, and placing their feet in it, ate greedily. Their feet, however, became so smeared with the honey that they could not use their wings, nor release themselves, and were suffocated. Just as they were expiring, they exclaimed, O foolish creatures that we are, for the sake of a little pleasure we have destroyed ourselves.
Pleasure bought with pains, hurts.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  23  /  28  

The Ass and the Horse
AN ASS besought a Horse to spare him a small portion of his feed. read more

The Ass and the Horse
AN ASS besought a Horse to spare him a small portion of his feed.
Yes, said the Horse; if any remains out of what I am now
eating I will give it you for the sake of my own superior
dignity, and if you will come when I reach my own stall in the
evening, I will give you a little sack full of barley. The Ass
replied, Thank you. But I can't think that you, who refuse me a
little matter now. will by and by confer on me a greater
benefit.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  18  /  32  

The Traveler and His Dog
A Traveler about to set out on a journey saw his Dog stand at the read more

The Traveler and His Dog
A Traveler about to set out on a journey saw his Dog stand at the door stretching himself. He asked him sharply: Why do you stand there gaping? Everything is ready but you, so come with me instantly. The Dog, wagging his tail, replied: O, master! I am quite ready; it is you for whom I am waiting.
The loiterer often blames delay on his more active friend.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  10  /  22  

The Mischievous Dog
A dog used to run up quietly to the heels of everyone he met, and to bite read more

The Mischievous Dog
A dog used to run up quietly to the heels of everyone he met, and to bite them without notice. His master suspended a bell about his neck so that the Dog might give notice of his presence wherever he went. Thinking it a mark of distinction, the Dog grew proud of his bell and went tinkling it all over the marketplace. One day an old hound said to him: Why do you make such an exhibition of yourself? That bell that you carry is not, believe me, any order of merit, but on the contrary a mark of disgrace, a public notice to all men to avoid you as an ill mannered dog.
Notoriety is often mistaken for fame.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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