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    The Sick Stag
    A sick stag lay down in a quiet corner of its pasture-ground. His companions came in great numbers to inquire after his health, and each one helped himself to a share of the food which had been placed for his use; so that he died, not from his sickness, but from the failure of the means of living.
    Evil companions bring more hurt than profit.

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  14  /  36  

The Cat and the Birds
A cat, hearing that the Birds in a certain aviary were ailing dressed himself up read more

The Cat and the Birds
A cat, hearing that the Birds in a certain aviary were ailing dressed himself up as a physician, and, taking his cane and a bag of instruments becoming his profession, went to call on them. He knocked at the door and inquired of the inmates how they all did, saying that if they were ill, he would be happy to prescribe for them and cure them. They replied, We are all very well, and shall continue so, if you will only be good enough to go away, and leave us as we are.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Traveler and His Dog
A Traveler about to set out on a journey saw his Dog stand at the read more

The Traveler and His Dog
A Traveler about to set out on a journey saw his Dog stand at the door stretching himself. He asked him sharply: Why do you stand there gaping? Everything is ready but you, so come with me instantly. The Dog, wagging his tail, replied: O, master! I am quite ready; it is you for whom I am waiting.
The loiterer often blames delay on his more active friend.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ant and the Chrysalis
An Ant nimbly running about in the sunshine in search of food came
across a read more

The Ant and the Chrysalis
An Ant nimbly running about in the sunshine in search of food came
across a Chrysalis that was very near its time of change. The
Chrysalis moved its tail, and thus attracted the attention of the Ant,
who then saw for the first time that it was alive. Poor, pitiable
animal! cried the Ant disdainfully. What a sad fate is yours!
While I can run hither and thither, at my pleasure, and, if I wish,
ascend the tallest tree, you lie imprisoned here in your shell, with
power only to move a joint or two of your scaly tail. The Chrysalis
heard all this, but did not try to make any reply. A few days after,
when the Ant passed that way again, nothing but the shell remained.
Wondering what had become of its contents, he felt himself suddenly
shaded and fanned by the gorgeous wings of a beautiful Butterfly.
Behold in me, said the Butterfly, your much-pitied friend! Boast
now of your powers to run and climb as long as you can get me to
listen. So saying, the Butterfly rose in the air, and, borne along
and aloft on the summer breeze, was soon lost to the sight of the
Ant forever.
Appearances are deceptive.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Fox and the Crow
A crow having stolen a bit of meat, perched in a tree and held it read more

The Fox and the Crow
A crow having stolen a bit of meat, perched in a tree and held it in her beak. A Fox, seeing this, longed to possess the meat himself, and by a wily stratagem succeeded. How handsome is the Crow, he exclaimed, in the beauty of her shape and in the fairness of her complexion! Oh, if her voice were only equal to her beauty, she would deservedly be considered the Queen of Birds! This he said deceitfully; but the Crow, anxious to refute the reflection cast upon her voice, set up a loud caw and dropped the flesh. The Fox quickly picked it up, and thus addressed the Crow: My good Crow, your voice is right enough, but your wit is wanting.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Salt Merchant and His Ass
A peddler drove his Ass to the seashore to buy salt. His road home read more

The Salt Merchant and His Ass
A peddler drove his Ass to the seashore to buy salt. His road home lay across a stream into which his Ass, making a false step, fell by accident and rose up again with his load considerably lighter, as the water melted the sack. The Peddler retraced his steps and refilled his panniers with a larger quantity of salt than before. When he came again to the stream, the Ass fell down on purpose in the same spot, and, regaining his feet with the weight of his load much diminished, brayed triumphantly as if he had obtained what he desired. The Peddler saw through his trick and drove him for the third time to the coast, where he bought a cargo of sponges instead of salt. The Ass, again playing the fool, fell down on purpose when he reached the stream, but the sponges became swollen with water, greatly increasing his load. And thus his trick recoiled on him, for he now carried on his back a double burden.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Astronomer
An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through read more

The Astronomer
An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through the suburbs with his whole attention fixed on the sky, he fell accidentally into a deep well. While he lamented and bewailed his sores and bruises, and cried loudly for help, a neighbor ran to the well, and learning what had happened said: Hark ye, old fellow, why, in striving to pry into what is in heaven, do you not manage to see what is on earth?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Hare and the Tortoise
A hare one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who read more

The Hare and the Tortoise
A hare one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who replied, laughing: Though you be swift as the wind, I will beat you in a race. The Hare, believing her assertion to be simply impossible, assented to the proposal; and they agreed that the Fox should choose the course and fix the goal. On the day appointed for the race the two started together. The Tortoise never for a moment stopped, but went on with a slow but steady pace straight to the end of the course. The Hare, lying down by the wayside, fell fast asleep. At last waking up, and moving as fast as he could, he saw the Tortoise had reached the goal, and was comfortably dozing after her fatigue.
Slow but steady wins the race.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Goatherd and the Wild Goats
A goatherd, driving his flock from their pasture at eventide, found some Wild Goats read more

The Goatherd and the Wild Goats
A goatherd, driving his flock from their pasture at eventide, found some Wild Goats mingled among them, and shut them up together with his own for the night. The next day it snowed very hard, so that he could not take the herd to their usual feeding places, but was obliged to keep them in the fold. He gave his own goats just sufficient food to keep them alive, but fed the strangers more abundantly in the hope of enticing them to stay with him and of making them his own. When the thaw set in, he led them all out to feed, and the Wild Goats scampered away as fast as they could to the mountains. The Goatherd scolded them for their ingratitude in leaving him, when during the storm he had taken more care of them than of his own herd. One of them, turning about, said to him: That is the very reason why we are so cautious; for if you yesterday treated us better than the Goats you have had so long, it is plain also that if others came after us, you would in the same manner prefer them to ourselves.
Old friends cannot with impunity be sacrificed for new ones.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Mole and His Mother
A mole, a creature blind from birth, once said to his Mother: I am sure read more

The Mole and His Mother
A mole, a creature blind from birth, once said to his Mother: I am sure than I can see, Mother! In the desire to prove to him his mistake, his Mother placed before him a few grains of frankincense, and asked, What is it?' The young Mole said, It is a pebble. His Mother exclaimed: My son, I am afraid that you are not only blind, but that you have lost your sense of smell.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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