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    The Horse and His Rider
    A horse soldier took the utmost pains with his charger. As long as the war lasted, he looked upon him as his fellow-helper in all emergencies and fed him carefully with hay and corn. But when the war was over, he only allowed him chaff to eat and made him carry heavy loads of wood, subjecting him to much slavish drudgery and ill-treatment. War was again proclaimed, however, and when the trumpet summoned him to his standard, the Soldier put on his charger its military trappings, and mounted, being clad in his heavy coat of mail. The Horse fell down straightway under the weight, no longer equal to the burden, and said to his master, You must now go to the war on foot, for you have transformed me from a Horse into an Ass; and how can you expect that I can again turn in a moment from an Ass to a Horse?'.

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  9  /  24  

The Boasting Traveler
A man who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, read more

The Boasting Traveler
A man who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, of the many wonderful and heroic feats he had performed in the different places he had visited. Among other things, he said that when he was at Rhodes he had leaped to such a distance that no man of his day could leap anywhere near him as to that, there were in Rhodes many persons who saw him do it and whom he could call as witnesses. One of the bystanders interrupted him, saying: Now, my good man, if this be all true there is no need of witnesses. Suppose this to be Rhodes, and leap for us.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  17  /  30  

The Father and His Two Daughters
A man had two daughters, the one married to a gardener, and the other read more

The Father and His Two Daughters
A man had two daughters, the one married to a gardener, and the other to a tile-maker. After a time he went to the daughter who had married the gardener, and inquired how she was and how all things went with her. She said, All things are prospering with me, and I have only one wish, that there may be a heavy fall of rain, in order that the plants may be well watered. Not long after, he went to the daughter who had married the tilemaker, and likewise inquired of her how she fared; she replied, I want for nothing, and have only one wish, that the dry weather may continue, and the sun shine hot and bright, so that the bricks might be dried. He said to her, If your sister wishes for rain, and you for dry weather, with which of the two am I to join my wishes?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  11  /  19  

The Two Pots
A river carried down in its stream two Pots, one made of earthenware and the other of read more

The Two Pots
A river carried down in its stream two Pots, one made of earthenware and the other of brass. The Earthen Pot said to the Brass Pot, Pray keep at a distance and do not come near me, for if you touch me ever so slightly, I shall be broken in pieces, and besides, I by no means wish to come near you.
Equals make the best friends.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  19  /  32  

The Fisherman and His Nets
A fisherman, engaged in his calling, made a very successful cast and captured a great read more

The Fisherman and His Nets
A fisherman, engaged in his calling, made a very successful cast and captured a great haul of fish. He managed by a skillful handling of his net to retain all the large fish and to draw them to the shore; but he could not prevent the smaller fish from falling back through the meshes of the net into the sea.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ant and the Chrysalis
An Ant nimbly running about in the sunshine in search of food came
across a read more

The Ant and the Chrysalis
An Ant nimbly running about in the sunshine in search of food came
across a Chrysalis that was very near its time of change. The
Chrysalis moved its tail, and thus attracted the attention of the Ant,
who then saw for the first time that it was alive. Poor, pitiable
animal! cried the Ant disdainfully. What a sad fate is yours!
While I can run hither and thither, at my pleasure, and, if I wish,
ascend the tallest tree, you lie imprisoned here in your shell, with
power only to move a joint or two of your scaly tail. The Chrysalis
heard all this, but did not try to make any reply. A few days after,
when the Ant passed that way again, nothing but the shell remained.
Wondering what had become of its contents, he felt himself suddenly
shaded and fanned by the gorgeous wings of a beautiful Butterfly.
Behold in me, said the Butterfly, your much-pitied friend! Boast
now of your powers to run and climb as long as you can get me to
listen. So saying, the Butterfly rose in the air, and, borne along
and aloft on the summer breeze, was soon lost to the sight of the
Ant forever.
Appearances are deceptive.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  14  /  36  

The Cat and the Birds
A cat, hearing that the Birds in a certain aviary were ailing dressed himself up read more

The Cat and the Birds
A cat, hearing that the Birds in a certain aviary were ailing dressed himself up as a physician, and, taking his cane and a bag of instruments becoming his profession, went to call on them. He knocked at the door and inquired of the inmates how they all did, saying that if they were ill, he would be happy to prescribe for them and cure them. They replied, We are all very well, and shall continue so, if you will only be good enough to go away, and leave us as we are.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Swallow and the Crow
The Swallow and the Crow had a contention about their plumage. The Crow put an read more

The Swallow and the Crow
The Swallow and the Crow had a contention about their plumage. The Crow put an end to the dispute by saying, Your feathers are all very well in the spring, but mine protect me against the winter.
Fair weather friends are not worth much.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  22  /  30  

The Fawn and His Mother
A young fawn once said to his Mother, You are larger than a dog, and read more

The Fawn and His Mother
A young fawn once said to his Mother, You are larger than a dog, and swifter, and more used to running, and you have your horns as a defense; why, then, O Mother! do the hounds frighten you so? She smiled, and said: I know full well, my son, that all you say is true. I have the advantages you mention, but when I hear even the bark of a single dog I feel ready to faint, and fly away as fast as I can.
No arguments will give courage to the coward.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a read more

The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a mortal bite on the Cottager's infant son. Grieving over his loss, the Father resolved to kill the Snake. The next day, when it came out of its hole for food, he took up his axe, but by swinging too hastily, missed its head and cut off only the end of its tail. After some time the Cottager, afraid that the Snake would bite him also, endeavored to make peace, and placed some bread and salt in the hole. The Snake, slightly hissing, said: There can henceforth be no peace between us; for whenever I see you I shall remember the loss of my tail, and whenever you see me you will be thinking of the death of your son.
No one truly forgets injuries in the presence of him who caused the injury.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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