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    The Fox and the Crow
    A crow having stolen a bit of meat, perched in a tree and held it in her beak. A Fox, seeing this, longed to possess the meat himself, and by a wily stratagem succeeded. How handsome is the Crow, he exclaimed, in the beauty of her shape and in the fairness of her complexion! Oh, if her voice were only equal to her beauty, she would deservedly be considered the Queen of Birds! This he said deceitfully; but the Crow, anxious to refute the reflection cast upon her voice, set up a loud caw and dropped the flesh. The Fox quickly picked it up, and thus addressed the Crow: My good Crow, your voice is right enough, but your wit is wanting.

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  10  /  17  

Hercules and the Wagoner
A CARTER was driving a wagon along a country lane, when the wheels sank down deep read more

Hercules and the Wagoner
A CARTER was driving a wagon along a country lane, when the wheels sank down deep into a rut. The rustic driver, stupefied and aghast, stood looking at the wagon, and did nothing but utter loud cries to Hercules to come and help him. Hercules, it is said, appeared and thus addressed him: Put your shoulders to the wheels, my man. Goad on your bullocks, and never more pray to me for help, until you have done your best to help yourself, or depend upon it you will henceforth pray in vain.
Self-help is the best help.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  10  /  16  

The Miser
A miser sold all that he had and bought a lump of gold, which he buried in a read more

The Miser
A miser sold all that he had and bought a lump of gold, which he buried in a hole in the ground by the side of an old wall and went to look at daily. One of his workmen observed his frequent visits to the spot and decided to watch his movements. He soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure, and digging down, came to the lump of gold, and stole it. The Miser, on his next visit, found the hole empty and began to tear his hair and to make loud lamentations. A neighbor, seeing him overcome with grief and learning the cause, said, Pray do not grieve so; but go and take a stone, and place it in the hole, and fancy that the gold is still lying there. It will do you quite the same service; for when the gold was there, you had it not, as you did not make the slightest use of it.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  32  /  43  

The Ass and the Grasshopper
An Ass having heard some Grasshoppers chirping, was highly enchanted; and, desiring to possess the read more

The Ass and the Grasshopper
An Ass having heard some Grasshoppers chirping, was highly enchanted; and, desiring to possess the same charms of melody, demanded what sort of food they lived on to give them such beautiful voices. They replied, The dew. The Ass resolved that he would live only upon dew, and in a short time died of hunger.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  16  /  29  

The Herdsman and the Lost Bull
A herdsman tending his flock in a forest lost a Bull-calf from the read more

The Herdsman and the Lost Bull
A herdsman tending his flock in a forest lost a Bull-calf from the fold. After a long and fruitless search, he made a vow that, if he could only discover the thief who had stolen the Calf, he would offer a lamb in sacrifice to Hermes, Pan, and the Guardian Deities of the forest. Not long afterwards, as he ascended a small hillock, he saw at its foot a Lion feeding on the Calf. Terrified at the sight, he lifted his eyes and his hands to heaven, and said: Just now I vowed to offer a lamb to the Guardian Deities of the forest if I could only find out who had robbed me; but now that I have discovered the thief, I would willingly add a full-grown Bull to the Calf I have lost, if I may only secure my own escape from him in safety.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  26  /  35  

The Stag in the Ox-Stall
A stag, roundly chased by the hounds and blinded by fear to the danger he read more

The Stag in the Ox-Stall
A stag, roundly chased by the hounds and blinded by fear to the danger he was running into, took shelter in a farmyard and hid himself in a shed among the oxen. An Ox gave him this kindly warning: O unhappy creature! why should you thus, of your own accord, incur destruction and trust yourself in the house of your enemy?' The Stag replied: Only allow me, friend, to stay where I am, and I will undertake to find some favorable opportunity of effecting my escape. At the approach of the evening the herdsman came to feed his cattle, but did not see the Stag; and even the farm-bailiff with several laborers passed through the shed and failed to notice him. The Stag, congratulating himself on his safety, began to express his sincere thanks to the Oxen who had kindly helped him in the hour of need. One of them again answered him: We indeed wish you well, but the danger is not over. There is one other yet to pass through the shed, who has as it were a hundred eyes, and until he has come and gone, your life is still in peril. At that moment the master himself entered, and having had to complain that his oxen had not been properly fed, he went up to their racks and cried out: Why is there such a scarcity of fodder? There is not half enough straw for them to lie on. Those lazy fellows have not even swept the cobwebs away. While he thus examined everything in turn, he spied the tips of the antlers of the Stag peeping out of the straw. Then summoning his laborers, he ordered that the Stag should be seized and killed.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Flies and the Honey-Pot
A number of Flies were attracted to a jar of honey which had been overturned read more

The Flies and the Honey-Pot
A number of Flies were attracted to a jar of honey which had been overturned in a housekeeper's room, and placing their feet in it, ate greedily. Their feet, however, became so smeared with the honey that they could not use their wings, nor release themselves, and were suffocated. Just as they were expiring, they exclaimed, O foolish creatures that we are, for the sake of a little pleasure we have destroyed ourselves.
Pleasure bought with pains, hurts.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  12  /  35  

The Bat and the Weasels
A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to read more

The Bat and the Weasels
A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to be spared his life. The Weasel refused, saying that he was by nature the enemy of all birds. The Bat assured him that he was not a bird, but a mouse, and thus was set free. Shortly afterwards the Bat again fell to the ground and was caught by another Weasel, whom he likewise entreated not to eat him. The Weasel said that he had a special hostility to mice. The Bat assured him that he was not a mouse, but a bat, and thus a second time escaped.
It is wise to turn circumstances to good account.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  17  /  30  

The Father and His Two Daughters
A man had two daughters, the one married to a gardener, and the other read more

The Father and His Two Daughters
A man had two daughters, the one married to a gardener, and the other to a tile-maker. After a time he went to the daughter who had married the gardener, and inquired how she was and how all things went with her. She said, All things are prospering with me, and I have only one wish, that there may be a heavy fall of rain, in order that the plants may be well watered. Not long after, he went to the daughter who had married the tilemaker, and likewise inquired of her how she fared; she replied, I want for nothing, and have only one wish, that the dry weather may continue, and the sun shine hot and bright, so that the bricks might be dried. He said to her, If your sister wishes for rain, and you for dry weather, with which of the two am I to join my wishes?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  10  /  18  

The Farmer and the Cranes
Some cranes made their feeding grounds on some plowlands newly sown with wheat. For a read more

The Farmer and the Cranes
Some cranes made their feeding grounds on some plowlands newly sown with wheat. For a long time the Farmer, brandishing an empty sling, chased them away by the terror he inspired; but when the birds found that the sling was only swung in the air, they ceased to take any notice of it and would not move. The Farmer, on seeing this, charged his sling with stones, and killed a great number. The remaining birds at once forsook his fields, crying to each other, It is time for us to be off to Liliput: for this man is no longer content to scare us, but begins to show us in earnest what he can do.
If words suffice not, blows must follow.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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