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    The Farmer and the Snake
    One winter a Farmer found a Snake stiff and frozen with cold. He had compassion on it, and taking it up, placed it in his bosom. The Snake was quickly revived by the warmth, and resuming its natural instincts, bit its benefactor, inflicting on him a mortal wound. Oh, cried the Farmer with his last breath, I am rightly served for pitying a scoundrel.
    The greatest kindness will not bind the ungrateful.

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  13  /  14  

The Kingdom of the Lion
THE beasts of the field and forest had a Lion as their king. He was read more

The Kingdom of the Lion
THE beasts of the field and forest had a Lion as their king. He was neither wrathful, cruel, nor tyrannical, but just and gentle as a king could be. During his reign he made a royal proclamation for a general assembly of all the birds and beasts, and drew up conditions for a universal league, in which the Wolf and the Lamb, the Panther and the Kid, the Tiger and the Stag, the Dog and the Hare, should live together in perfect peace and amity. The Hare said, Oh, how I have longed to see this day, in which the weak shall take their place with impunity by the side of the strong. And after the Hare said this, he ran for his life.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Boy and the Filberts
A boy put his hand into a pitcher full of filberts. He grasped as many read more

The Boy and the Filberts
A boy put his hand into a pitcher full of filberts. He grasped as many as he could possibly hold, but when he tried to pull out his hand, he was prevented from doing so by the neck of the pitcher. Unwilling to lose his filberts, and yet unable to withdraw his hand, he burst into tears and bitterly lamented his disappointment. A bystander said to him, Be satisfied with half the quantity, and you will readily draw out your hand.
Do not attempt too much at once.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Mole and His Mother
A mole, a creature blind from birth, once said to his Mother: I am sure read more

The Mole and His Mother
A mole, a creature blind from birth, once said to his Mother: I am sure than I can see, Mother! In the desire to prove to him his mistake, his Mother placed before him a few grains of frankincense, and asked, What is it?' The young Mole said, It is a pebble. His Mother exclaimed: My son, I am afraid that you are not only blind, but that you have lost your sense of smell.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Aethiop
The purchaser of a black servant was persuaded that the color of his skin arose from dirt contracted read more

The Aethiop
The purchaser of a black servant was persuaded that the color of his skin arose from dirt contracted through the neglect of his former masters. On bringing him home he resorted to every means of cleaning, and subjected the man to incessant scrubbings. The servant caught a severe cold, but he never changed his color or complexion.
What's bred in the bone will stick to the flesh.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Wolf and the Crane
A WOLF who had a bone stuck in his throat hired a Crane, for a read more

The Wolf and the Crane
A WOLF who had a bone stuck in his throat hired a Crane, for a large sum, to put her head into his mouth and draw out the bone. When the Crane had extracted the bone and demanded the promised payment, the Wolf, grinning and grinding his teeth, exclaimed: Why, you have surely already had a sufficient recompense, in having been permitted to draw out your head in safety from the mouth and jaws of a wolf.
In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you
escape injury for your pains.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ass and the Lapdog
A man had an Ass, and a Maltese Lapdog, a very great beauty. The read more

The Ass and the Lapdog
A man had an Ass, and a Maltese Lapdog, a very great beauty. The Ass was left in a stable and had plenty of oats and hay to eat, just as any other Ass would. The Lapdog knew many tricks and was a great favorite with his master, who often fondled him and seldom went out to dine without bringing him home some tidbit to eat. The Ass, on the contrary, had much work to do in grinding the corn-mill and in carrying wood from the forest or burdens from the farm. He often lamented his own hard fate and contrasted it with the luxury and idleness of the Lapdog, till at last one day he broke his cords and halter, and galloped into his master's house, kicking up his heels without measure, and frisking and fawning as well as he could. He next tried to jump about his master as he had seen the Lapdog do, but he broke the table and smashed all the dishes upon it to atoms. He then attempted to lick his master, and jumped upon his back. The servants, hearing the strange hubbub and perceiving the danger of their master, quickly relieved him, and drove out the Ass to his stable with kicks and clubs and cuffs. The Ass, as he returned to his stall beaten nearly to death, thus lamented: I have brought it all on myself! Why could I not have been contented to labor with my companions, and not wish to be idle all the day like that useless little Lapdog!

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Fighting Cocks and the Eagle
Two game cocks were fiercely fighting for the mastery of the farmyard. One at read more

The Fighting Cocks and the Eagle
Two game cocks were fiercely fighting for the mastery of the farmyard. One at last put the other to flight. The vanquished Cock skulked away and hid himself in a quiet corner, while the conqueror, flying up to a high wall, flapped his wings and crowed exultingly with all his might. An Eagle sailing through the air pounced upon him and carried him off in his talons. The vanquished Cock immediately came out of his corner, and ruled henceforth with undisputed mastery.
Pride goes before destruction.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Oxen and the Butchers
The oxen once upon a time sought to destroy the Butchers, who practiced a trade read more

The Oxen and the Butchers
The oxen once upon a time sought to destroy the Butchers, who practiced a trade destructive to their race. They assembled on a certain day to carry out their purpose, and sharpened their horns for the contest. But one of them who was exceedingly old (for many a field had he plowed) thus spoke: These Butchers, it is true, slaughter us, but they do so with skillful hands, and with no unnecessary pain. If we get rid of them, we shall fall into the hands of unskillful operators, and thus suffer a double death: for you may be assured, that though all the Butchers should perish, yet will men never want beef.
Do not be in a hurry to change one evil for another.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Bat and the Weasels
A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to read more

The Bat and the Weasels
A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to be spared his life. The Weasel refused, saying that he was by nature the enemy of all birds. The Bat assured him that he was not a bird, but a mouse, and thus was set free. Shortly afterwards the Bat again fell to the ground and was caught by another Weasel, whom he likewise entreated not to eat him. The Weasel said that he had a special hostility to mice. The Bat assured him that he was not a mouse, but a bat, and thus a second time escaped.
It is wise to turn circumstances to good account.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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