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    The Wolf and the Lamb
    WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands on him, but to find some plea to justify to the Lamb the Wolf's right to eat him. He thus addressed him: "Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted me." "Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a mournful tone of voice, "I was not then born." Then said the Wolf, "You feed in my pasture." "No, good sir," replied the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass." Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my well." "No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I never yet drank water, for as yet my mother's milk is both food and drink to me." Upon which the Wolf seized him and ate him up, saying, "Well! I won't remain supperless, even though you refute every one of my imputations." The tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny.

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  11  /  27  

The Bear and the Fox
A bear boasted very much of his philanthropy, saying that of all animals he was read more

The Bear and the Fox
A bear boasted very much of his philanthropy, saying that of all animals he was the most tender in his regard for man, for he had such respect for him that he would not even touch his dead body. A Fox hearing these words said with a smile to the Bear, Oh! that you would eat the dead and not the living.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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  19  /  35  

The Boy Hunting Locusts
A boy was hunting for locusts. He had caught a goodly number, when he saw a read more

The Boy Hunting Locusts
A boy was hunting for locusts. He had caught a goodly number, when he saw a Scorpion, and mistaking him for a locust, reached out his hand to take him. The Scorpion, showing his sting, said: If you had but touched me, my friend, you would have lost me, and all your locusts too!

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Farmer and the Stork
A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which read more

The Farmer and the Stork
A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. Pray save me, Master, he said, and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane. The Farmer laughed aloud and said, It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company.
Birds of a feather flock together.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Cat and the Cock
A cat caught a Cock, and pondered how he might find a reasonable excuse for read more

The Cat and the Cock
A cat caught a Cock, and pondered how he might find a reasonable excuse for eating him. He accused him of being a nuisance to men by crowing in the nighttime and not permitting them to sleep. The Cock defended himself by saying that he did this for the benefit of men, that they might rise in time for their labors. The Cat replied, Although you abound in specious apologies, I shall not remain supperless; and he made a meal of him.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Man Bitten by a Dog
A man who had been bitten by a Dog went about in quest of read more

The Man Bitten by a Dog
A man who had been bitten by a Dog went about in quest of someone who might heal him. A friend, meeting him and learning what he wanted, said, If you would be cured, take a piece of bread, and dip it in the blood from your wound, and go and give it to the Dog that bit you. The Man who had been bitten laughed at this advice and said, Why? If I should do so, it would be as if I should beg every Dog in the town to bite me.
Benefits bestowed upon the evil-disposed increase their means of injuring you.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Lion, the Mouse, and the Fox
A lion, fatigued by the heat of a summer's day, fell fast asleep read more

The Lion, the Mouse, and the Fox
A lion, fatigued by the heat of a summer's day, fell fast asleep in his den. A Mouse ran over his mane and ears and woke him from his slumbers. He rose up and shook himself in great wrath, and searched every corner of his den to find the Mouse. A Fox seeing him said: A fine Lion you are, to be frightened of a Mouse. 'Tis not the Mouse I fear, said the Lion; I resent his familiarity and ill-breeding.
Little liberties are great offenses.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Vain Jackdaw
Jupiter determined, it is said, to create a sovereign over the birds, and made proclamation that on read more

The Vain Jackdaw
Jupiter determined, it is said, to create a sovereign over the birds, and made proclamation that on a certain day they should all present themselves before him, when he would himself choose the most beautiful among them to be king. The Jackdaw, knowing his own ugliness, searched through the woods and fields, and collected the feathers which had fallen from the wings of his companions, and stuck them in all parts of his body, hoping thereby to make himself the most beautiful of all. When the appointed day arrived, and the birds had assembled before Jupiter, the Jackdaw also made his appearance in his many feathered finery. But when Jupiter proposed to make him king because of the beauty of his plumage, the birds indignantly protested, and each plucked from him his own feathers, leaving the Jackdaw nothing but a Jackdaw.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Old Man and Death
An old man was employed in cutting wood in the forest, and, in carrying the read more

The Old Man and Death
An old man was employed in cutting wood in the forest, and, in carrying the faggots to the city for sale one day, became very wearied with his long journey. He sat down by the wayside, and throwing down his load, besought Death to come. Death immediately appeared in answer to his summons and asked for what reason he had called him. The Old Man hurriedly replied, That, lifting up the load, you may place it again upon my shoulders.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ass and the Horse
AN ASS besought a Horse to spare him a small portion of his feed. read more

The Ass and the Horse
AN ASS besought a Horse to spare him a small portion of his feed.
Yes, said the Horse; if any remains out of what I am now
eating I will give it you for the sake of my own superior
dignity, and if you will come when I reach my own stall in the
evening, I will give you a little sack full of barley. The Ass
replied, Thank you. But I can't think that you, who refuse me a
little matter now. will by and by confer on me a greater
benefit.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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