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    The Wolf and the Lamb
    WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands on him, but to find some plea to justify to the Lamb the Wolf's right to eat him. He thus addressed him: "Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted me." "Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a mournful tone of voice, "I was not then born." Then said the Wolf, "You feed in my pasture." "No, good sir," replied the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass." Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my well." "No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I never yet drank water, for as yet my mother's milk is both food and drink to me." Upon which the Wolf seized him and ate him up, saying, "Well! I won't remain supperless, even though you refute every one of my imputations." The tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny.

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  25  /  25  

The Horse and His Rider
A horse soldier took the utmost pains with his charger. As long as the war read more

The Horse and His Rider
A horse soldier took the utmost pains with his charger. As long as the war lasted, he looked upon him as his fellow-helper in all emergencies and fed him carefully with hay and corn. But when the war was over, he only allowed him chaff to eat and made him carry heavy loads of wood, subjecting him to much slavish drudgery and ill-treatment. War was again proclaimed, however, and when the trumpet summoned him to his standard, the Soldier put on his charger its military trappings, and mounted, being clad in his heavy coat of mail. The Horse fell down straightway under the weight, no longer equal to the burden, and said to his master, You must now go to the war on foot, for you have transformed me from a Horse into an Ass; and how can you expect that I can again turn in a moment from an Ass to a Horse?'.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Mountain in Labor
A mountain was once greatly agitated. Loud groans and noises were heard, and crowds of people read more

The Mountain in Labor
A mountain was once greatly agitated. Loud groans and noises were heard, and crowds of people came from all parts to see what was the matter. While they were assembled in anxious expectation of some terrible calamity, out came a Mouse.
Don't make much ado about nothing.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Horse and Groom
A groom used to spend whole days in currycombing and rubbing down his Horse, but at read more

The Horse and Groom
A groom used to spend whole days in currycombing and rubbing down his Horse, but at the same time stole his oats and sold them for his own profit. Alas! said the Horse, if you really wish me to be in good condition, you should groom me less, and feed me more.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Widow and Her Little Maidens
A widow who was fond of cleaning had two little maidens to wait on read more

The Widow and Her Little Maidens
A widow who was fond of cleaning had two little maidens to wait on her. She was in the habit of waking them early in the morning, at cockcrow. The maidens, aggravated by such excessive labor, resolved to kill the cock who roused their mistress so early. When they had done this, they found that they had only prepared for themselves greater troubles, for their mistress, no longer hearing the hour from the cock, woke them up to their work in the middle of the night.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a read more

The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a mortal bite on the Cottager's infant son. Grieving over his loss, the Father resolved to kill the Snake. The next day, when it came out of its hole for food, he took up his axe, but by swinging too hastily, missed its head and cut off only the end of its tail. After some time the Cottager, afraid that the Snake would bite him also, endeavored to make peace, and placed some bread and salt in the hole. The Snake, slightly hissing, said: There can henceforth be no peace between us; for whenever I see you I shall remember the loss of my tail, and whenever you see me you will be thinking of the death of your son.
No one truly forgets injuries in the presence of him who caused the injury.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Farmer and the Stork
A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which read more

The Farmer and the Stork
A farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. Pray save me, Master, he said, and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane. The Farmer laughed aloud and said, It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company.
Birds of a feather flock together.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Two Dogs
A man had two dogs: a Hound, trained to assist him in his sports, and a Housedog, read more

The Two Dogs
A man had two dogs: a Hound, trained to assist him in his sports, and a Housedog, taught to watch the house. When he returned home after a good day's sport, he always gave the Housedog a large share of his spoil. The Hound, feeling much aggrieved at this, reproached his companion, saying, It is very hard to have all this labor, while you, who do not assist in the chase, luxuriate on the fruits of my exertions. The Housedog replied, Do not blame me, my friend, but find fault with the master, who has not taught me to labor, but to depend for subsistence on the labor of others.
Children are not to be blamed for the faults of their parents.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Boy and the Nettles
A boy was stung by a Nettle. He ran home and told his Mother, saying, read more

The Boy and the Nettles
A boy was stung by a Nettle. He ran home and told his Mother, saying, Although it hurts me very much, I only touched it gently. That was just why it stung you, said his Mother. The next time you touch a Nettle, grasp it boldly, and it will be soft as silk to your hand, and not in the least hurt you.
Whatever you do, do with all your might.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Farmer and His Sons
A father, being on the point of death, wished to be sure that his sons read more

The Farmer and His Sons
A father, being on the point of death, wished to be sure that his sons would give the same attention to his farm as he himself had given it. He called them to his bedside and said, My sons, there is a great treasure hid in one of my vineyards. The sons, after his death, took their spades and mattocks and carefully dug over every portion of their land. They found no treasure, but the vines repaid their labor by an extraordinary and superabundant crop.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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