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    The Wild Ass and the Lion
    A wild ass and a Lion entered into an alliance so that they might capture the beasts of the forest with greater ease. The Lion agreed to assist the Wild Ass with his strength, while the Wild Ass gave the Lion the benefit of his greater speed. When they had taken as many beasts as their necessities required, the Lion undertook to distribute the prey, and for this purpose divided it into three shares. I will take the first share, he said, because I am King: and the second share, as a partner with you in the chase: and the third share (believe me) will be a source of great evil to you, unless you willingly resign it to me, and set off as fast as you can.
    Might makes right.

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The Two Dogs
A man had two dogs: a Hound, trained to assist him in his sports, and a Housedog, read more

The Two Dogs
A man had two dogs: a Hound, trained to assist him in his sports, and a Housedog, taught to watch the house. When he returned home after a good day's sport, he always gave the Housedog a large share of his spoil. The Hound, feeling much aggrieved at this, reproached his companion, saying, It is very hard to have all this labor, while you, who do not assist in the chase, luxuriate on the fruits of my exertions. The Housedog replied, Do not blame me, my friend, but find fault with the master, who has not taught me to labor, but to depend for subsistence on the labor of others.
Children are not to be blamed for the faults of their parents.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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Jupiter and the Monkey
Jupiter issued a proclamation to all the beasts of the forest and promised a royal reward read more

Jupiter and the Monkey
Jupiter issued a proclamation to all the beasts of the forest and promised a royal reward to the one whose offspring should be deemed the handsomest. The Monkey came with the rest and presented, with all a mother's tenderness, a flat-nosed, hairless, ill-featured young Monkey as a candidate for the promised reward. A general laugh saluted her on the presentation of her son. She resolutely said, I know not whether Jupiter will allot the prize to my son, but this I do know, that he is at least in the eyes of me his mother, the dearest, handsomest, and most beautiful of all.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Fox and the Goat
A fox one day fell into a deep well and could find no means of read more

The Fox and the Goat
A fox one day fell into a deep well and could find no means of escape. A Goat, overcome with thirst, came to the same well, and seeing the Fox, inquired if the water was good. Concealing his sad plight under a merry guise, the Fox indulged in a lavish praise of the water, saying it was excellent beyond measure, and encouraging him to descend. The Goat, mindful only of his thirst, thoughtlessly jumped down, but just as he drank, the Fox informed him of the difficulty they were both in and suggested a scheme for their common escape. If, said he, you will place your forefeet upon the wall and bend your head, I will run up your back and escape, and will help you out afterwards. The Goat readily assented and the Fox leaped upon his back. Steadying himself with the Goat's horns, he safely reached the mouth of the well and made off as fast as he could. When the Goat upbraided him for breaking his promise, he turned around and cried out, You foolish old fellow! If you had as many brains in your head as you have hairs in your beard, you would never have gone down before you had inspected the way up, nor have exposed yourself to dangers from which you had no means of escape.
Look before you leap.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Man Bitten by a Dog
A man who had been bitten by a Dog went about in quest of read more

The Man Bitten by a Dog
A man who had been bitten by a Dog went about in quest of someone who might heal him. A friend, meeting him and learning what he wanted, said, If you would be cured, take a piece of bread, and dip it in the blood from your wound, and go and give it to the Dog that bit you. The Man who had been bitten laughed at this advice and said, Why? If I should do so, it would be as if I should beg every Dog in the town to bite me.
Benefits bestowed upon the evil-disposed increase their means of injuring you.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Vine and the Goat
A vine was luxuriant in the time of vintage with leaves and grapes. A Goat, read more

The Vine and the Goat
A vine was luxuriant in the time of vintage with leaves and grapes. A Goat, passing by, nibbled its young tendrils and its leaves. The Vine addressed him and said: Why do you thus injure me without a cause, and crop my leaves? Is there no young grass left? But I shall not have to wait long for my just revenge; for if you now should crop my leaves, and cut me down to my root, I shall provide the wine to pour over you when you are led as a victim to the sacrifice.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a read more

The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a mortal bite on the Cottager's infant son. Grieving over his loss, the Father resolved to kill the Snake. The next day, when it came out of its hole for food, he took up his axe, but by swinging too hastily, missed its head and cut off only the end of its tail. After some time the Cottager, afraid that the Snake would bite him also, endeavored to make peace, and placed some bread and salt in the hole. The Snake, slightly hissing, said: There can henceforth be no peace between us; for whenever I see you I shall remember the loss of my tail, and whenever you see me you will be thinking of the death of your son.
No one truly forgets injuries in the presence of him who caused the injury.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Old Woman and the Physician
An old woman having lost the use of her eyes, called in a Physician read more

The Old Woman and the Physician
An old woman having lost the use of her eyes, called in a Physician to heal them, and made this bargain with him in the presence of witnesses: that if he should cure her blindness, he should receive from her a sum of money; but if her infirmity remained, she should give him nothing. This agreement being made, the Physician, time after time, applied his salve to her eyes, and on every visit took something away, stealing all her property little by little. And when he had got all she had, he healed her and demanded the promised payment. The Old Woman, when she recovered her sight and saw none of her goods in her house, would give him nothing. The Physician insisted on his claim, and. as she still refused, summoned her before the Judge. The Old Woman, standing up in the Court, argued: This man here speaks the truth in what he says; for I did promise to give him a sum of money if I should recover my sight: but if I continued blind, I was to give him nothing. Now he declares that I am healed. I on the contrary affirm that I am still blind; for when I lost the use of my eyes, I saw in my house various chattels and valuable goods: but now, though he swears I am cured of my blindness, I am not able to see a single thing in it.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Hawk, the Kite, and the Pigeons
The pigeons, terrified by the appearance of a Kite, called upon the Hawk read more

The Hawk, the Kite, and the Pigeons
The pigeons, terrified by the appearance of a Kite, called upon the Hawk to defend them. He at once consented. When they had admitted him into the cote, they found that he made more havoc and slew a larger number of them in one day than the Kite could pounce upon in a whole year.
Avoid a remedy that is worse than the disease.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Boasting Traveler
A man who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, read more

The Boasting Traveler
A man who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, of the many wonderful and heroic feats he had performed in the different places he had visited. Among other things, he said that when he was at Rhodes he had leaped to such a distance that no man of his day could leap anywhere near him as to that, there were in Rhodes many persons who saw him do it and whom he could call as witnesses. One of the bystanders interrupted him, saying: Now, my good man, if this be all true there is no need of witnesses. Suppose this to be Rhodes, and leap for us.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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