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O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day! -The Two Gentleman of Verona. Act read more

O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day! -The Two Gentleman of Verona. Act i. Sc. 3.

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  11  /  10  

The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It read more

The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest: It blesseth him that gives and him that takes. 'T is mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That in the course of justice none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy. -The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

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I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will read more

I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What news on the Rialto? -The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

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  5  /  17  

We would, and we would not. -Measure for Measure. Act iv. Sc. 4.

We would, and we would not. -Measure for Measure. Act iv. Sc. 4.

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  5  /  11  

Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on,—how then? Can honour set read more

Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on,—how then? Can honour set to a leg? no: or an arm? no: or take away the grief of a wound? no. Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? no. What is honour? a word. What is in that word honour; what is that honour? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? he that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no. 'T is insensible, then? yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore I 'll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon. And so ends my catechism. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 1.

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  7  /  8  

What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice? -The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice? -The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

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  9  /  10  

It is a wise father that knows his own child. -The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

It is a wise father that knows his own child. -The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

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A buck of the first head. -Love's Labour 's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

A buck of the first head. -Love's Labour 's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

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Where the bee sucks, there suck I; In a cowslip's bell I lie. -The Tempest. Act v. Sc. 1.

Where the bee sucks, there suck I; In a cowslip's bell I lie. -The Tempest. Act v. Sc. 1.

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