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Falstaff sweats to death, And lards the lean earth as he walks along. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. read more

Falstaff sweats to death, And lards the lean earth as he walks along. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 2.

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He doth nothing but talk of his horse. -The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

He doth nothing but talk of his horse. -The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

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From the still-vexed Bermoothes. -The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

From the still-vexed Bermoothes. -The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

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I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than read more

I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than I. -Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

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He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat. -Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat. -Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

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When Fortune means to men most good, She looks upon them with a threatening eye. -King John. Act iii. Sc. read more

When Fortune means to men most good, She looks upon them with a threatening eye. -King John. Act iii. Sc. 4.

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I am a tainted wether of the flock, Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit Drops earliest to the read more

I am a tainted wether of the flock, Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit Drops earliest to the ground. -The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

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Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens. -As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens. -As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 1.

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Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on,—how then? Can honour set read more

Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on,—how then? Can honour set to a leg? no: or an arm? no: or take away the grief of a wound? no. Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? no. What is honour? a word. What is in that word honour; what is that honour? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? he that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no. 'T is insensible, then? yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore I 'll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon. And so ends my catechism. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 1.

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