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    I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him. He hates our sacred nation, and he rails, Even there where merchants most do congregate. -The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

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  5  /  9  

The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees more devils than vast hell can read more

The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt: The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. Such tricks hath strong imagination, That if it would but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of that joy; Or in the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear! -A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.

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We have some salt of our youth in us. -The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 3.

We have some salt of our youth in us. -The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 3.

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For the rain it raineth every day. -Twelfth Night. Act v. Sc. 1.

For the rain it raineth every day. -Twelfth Night. Act v. Sc. 1.

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This earth that bears thee dead Bears not alive so stout a gentleman. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. read more

This earth that bears thee dead Bears not alive so stout a gentleman. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

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But love is blind, and lovers cannot see The pretty follies that themselves commit. -The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. read more

But love is blind, and lovers cannot see The pretty follies that themselves commit. -The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 6.

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A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing. -A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing. -A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 1.

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The boy hath sold him a bargain,—a goose. -Love's Labour 's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The boy hath sold him a bargain,—a goose. -Love's Labour 's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

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From lowest place when virtuous things proceed, The place is dignified by the doer's deed. -All 's Well that Ends read more

From lowest place when virtuous things proceed, The place is dignified by the doer's deed. -All 's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 3.

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Didst thou never hear That things ill got had ever bad success? And happy always was it for that son read more

Didst thou never hear That things ill got had ever bad success? And happy always was it for that son Whose father for his hoarding went to hell? -King Henry VI. Part III. Act ii. Sc. 2.

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