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Let me take you a button-hole lower. -Love's Labour 's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

Let me take you a button-hole lower. -Love's Labour 's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

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So shaken as we are, so wan with care. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 1.

So shaken as we are, so wan with care. -King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 1.

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All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. -King Richard II. read more

All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. -King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.

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A fellow that hath had losses, and one that hath two gowns and every thing handsome about him. -Much Ado read more

A fellow that hath had losses, and one that hath two gowns and every thing handsome about him. -Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

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Nothing comes amiss; so money comes withal. -The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 2.

Nothing comes amiss; so money comes withal. -The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 2.

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O father Abram! what these Christians are, Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect The thoughts of others! -The Merchant read more

O father Abram! what these Christians are, Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect The thoughts of others! -The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

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Look in the chronicles; we came in with Richard Conqueror. -The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Sc. 1.

Look in the chronicles; we came in with Richard Conqueror. -The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Sc. 1.

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Thus ornament is but the guiled shore To a most dangerous sea. -The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Thus ornament is but the guiled shore To a most dangerous sea. -The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

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Let still the woman take An elder than herself: so wears she to him, So sways she level in her read more

Let still the woman take An elder than herself: so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. -Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

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