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    The Widow and Her Little Maidens
    A widow who was fond of cleaning had two little maidens to wait on her. She was in the habit of waking them early in the morning, at cockcrow. The maidens, aggravated by such excessive labor, resolved to kill the cock who roused their mistress so early. When they had done this, they found that they had only prepared for themselves greater troubles, for their mistress, no longer hearing the hour from the cock, woke them up to their work in the middle of the night.

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The Father and His Sons
A father had a family of sons who were perpetually quarreling among themselves. When he read more

The Father and His Sons
A father had a family of sons who were perpetually quarreling among themselves. When he failed to heal their disputes by his exhortations, he determined to give them a practical illustration of the evils of disunion; and for this purpose he one day told them to bring him a bundle of sticks. When they had done so, he placed the faggot into the hands of each of them in succession, and ordered them to break it in pieces. They tried with all their strength, and were not able to do it. He next opened the faggot, took the sticks separately, one by one, and again put them into his sons' hands, upon which they broke them easily. He then addressed them in these words: My sons, if you are of one mind, and unite to assist each other, you will be as this faggot, uninjured by all the attempts of your enemies; but if you are divided among yourselves, you will be broken as easily as these sticks.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Apes and the Two Travelers
TWO MEN, one who always spoke the truth and the other who told
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The Apes and the Two Travelers
TWO MEN, one who always spoke the truth and the other who told
nothing but lies, were traveling together and by chance came to
the land of Apes. One of the Apes, who had raised himself to be
king, commanded them to be seized and brought before him, that he
might know what was said of him among men. He ordered at the
same time that all the Apes be arranged in a long row on his
right hand and on his left, and that a throne be placed for him,
as was the custom among men. After these preparations he
signified that the two men should be brought before him, and
greeted them with this salutation: What sort of a king do I seem
to you to be, O strangers?' The Lying Traveler replied, You seem
to me a most mighty king. And what is your estimate of those
you see around me?' These, he made answer, are worthy
companions of yourself, fit at least to be ambassadors and
leaders of armies. The Ape and all his court, gratified with the
lie, commanded that a handsome present be given to the flatterer.
On this the truthful Traveler thought to himself, If so great a
reward be given for a lie, with what gift may not I be rewarded,
if, according to my custom, I tell the truth?' The Ape quickly
turned to him. And pray how do I and these my friends around me
seem to you?' Thou art, he said, a most excellent Ape, and all
these thy companions after thy example are excellent Apes too.
The King of the Apes, enraged at hearing these truths, gave him
over to the teeth and claws of his companions.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Lion and the Mouse
A LION was awakened from sleep by a Mouse running over his face. Rising up read more

The Lion and the Mouse
A LION was awakened from sleep by a Mouse running over his face. Rising up angrily, he caught him and was about to kill him, when the Mouse piteously entreated, saying: If you would only spare my life, I would be sure to repay your kindness. The Lion laughed and let him go. It happened shortly after this that the Lion was caught by some hunters, who bound him by st ropes to the ground. The Mouse, recognizing his roar, came gnawed the rope with his teeth, and set him free, exclaim
You ridiculed the idea of my ever being able to help you, expecting to receive from me any repayment of your favor; I now you know that it is possible for even a Mouse to con benefits on a Lion.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Pomegranat, Apple-Tree and Bramble
The pomegranate and Apple-Tree disputed as to which was the most beautiful. When their strife read more

The Pomegranat, Apple-Tree and Bramble
The pomegranate and Apple-Tree disputed as to which was the most beautiful. When their strife was at its height, a Bramble from the neighboring hedge lifted up its voice, and said in a boastful tone: Pray, my dear friends, in my presence at least cease from such vain disputings.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Cock and the Jewel
A COCK, scratching for food for himself and his hens, found a precious stone read more

The Cock and the Jewel
A COCK, scratching for food for himself and his hens, found a precious stone and exclaimed: If your owner had found thee, and not I, he would have taken thee up, and have set thee in thy first estate; but I have found thee for no purpose. I would rather have one barleycorn than all the jewels in the world.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a read more

The Laborer and the Snake
A snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a cottage, inflicted a mortal bite on the Cottager's infant son. Grieving over his loss, the Father resolved to kill the Snake. The next day, when it came out of its hole for food, he took up his axe, but by swinging too hastily, missed its head and cut off only the end of its tail. After some time the Cottager, afraid that the Snake would bite him also, endeavored to make peace, and placed some bread and salt in the hole. The Snake, slightly hissing, said: There can henceforth be no peace between us; for whenever I see you I shall remember the loss of my tail, and whenever you see me you will be thinking of the death of your son.
No one truly forgets injuries in the presence of him who caused the injury.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Goatherd and the Wild Goats
A goatherd, driving his flock from their pasture at eventide, found some Wild Goats read more

The Goatherd and the Wild Goats
A goatherd, driving his flock from their pasture at eventide, found some Wild Goats mingled among them, and shut them up together with his own for the night. The next day it snowed very hard, so that he could not take the herd to their usual feeding places, but was obliged to keep them in the fold. He gave his own goats just sufficient food to keep them alive, but fed the strangers more abundantly in the hope of enticing them to stay with him and of making them his own. When the thaw set in, he led them all out to feed, and the Wild Goats scampered away as fast as they could to the mountains. The Goatherd scolded them for their ingratitude in leaving him, when during the storm he had taken more care of them than of his own herd. One of them, turning about, said to him: That is the very reason why we are so cautious; for if you yesterday treated us better than the Goats you have had so long, it is plain also that if others came after us, you would in the same manner prefer them to ourselves.
Old friends cannot with impunity be sacrificed for new ones.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Fir-Tree and the Bramble
A fir-tree said boastingly to the Bramble, You are useful for nothing at all; while read more

The Fir-Tree and the Bramble
A fir-tree said boastingly to the Bramble, You are useful for nothing at all; while I am everywhere used for roofs and houses. The Bramble answered: 'You poor creature, if you would only call to mind the axes and saws which are about to hew you down, you would have reason to wish that you had grown up a Bramble, not a Fir-Tree.
Better poverty without care, than riches with.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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The Ass and His Masters
AN ASS, belonging to an herb-seller who gave him too little food
and too read more

The Ass and His Masters
AN ASS, belonging to an herb-seller who gave him too little food
and too much work made a petition to Jupiter to be released from
his present service and provided with another master. Jupiter,
after warning him that he would repent his request, caused him to
be sold to a tile-maker. Shortly afterwards, finding that he had
heavier loads to carry and harder work in the brick-field, he
petitioned for another change of master. Jupiter, telling him
that it would be the last time that he could grant his request,
ordained that he be sold to a tanner. The Ass found that he had
fallen into worse hands, and noting his master's occupation,
said, groaning: It would have been better for me to have been
either starved by the one, or to have been overworked by the
other of my former masters, than to have been bought by my
present owner, who will even after I am dead tan my hide, and
make me useful to him.
He that finds discontentment in one place is not likely to find happiness in another.

by Aesop Found in: Aesop fables Quotes,
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